Deep sleep may reinforce new motor skills: Study

Deep sleep may reinforce new motor skills: Study

Deep sleep may reinforce new motor skills: Study

Skills involving manipulation of objects, scientists of Indian origin found.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco in the United States found that during the rapid movement of non-sleep (REM) eyes, slow brain waves reinforce nerve contact points that are directly related to a task that has Newly acquired during wakefulness, while weakening neural connections that are not.

“This may be related to the notion of” pulling out the bottom “of how to perform a new task. Sleep seems to reduce neural activity that is not related to a task that we are in the process of learning,” he said Karunesh Ganguly, associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

The researchers used a system known as the brain-machine interface name (BMI) to better understand how the brain takes on new abilities during sleep.

Electrodes were implanted in the motor area of rat brain to send electrical signals to a computer, resulting in the movement of an individual mechanical device.

Because neural circuits are dynamic, rat brains have been redefined to control this unit as fast as they would if rats were practicing new ways of controlling their own limbs.

“A particular neuron can usually be dedicated to controlling a limb, but we can create a new relationship of this neuron with an external bodyless device,” said Tanuj Gulati, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco.

“A particular neuron can usually be dedicated to controlling a limb, but we can create a new relationship of this neuron with an external device without a body,” said Gulati, lead author of the study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Researchers connected neurons in the brains of rats with implanted electrodes, which controlled a mechanical water channel. The water fountain was behind a small door in front of the mice.

From the beak down, the rats had to learn to use a computer-driven mechanism to move towards them.

As the rats explored several strategies to control the peak, some of which include open motions, neurons are sometimes activated adjacent to the electrodes.

When appropriate neurons were activated, the team moved the water stream, according to the researchers.

“Over time, rats learn to limit the actual movement of the beak, they know they do not really need to flex the arm or do anything to make it move,” Gulati said.

“All they have to do is voluntarily control the pipeline and they will come to them,” he added.

The researchers observed that once the rats had taken the task while they were awake, some neural models continued to “reproduce” during sleep.

“This shows that you can not ignore sleep. What you are trying to do is in patients who try to regain movement control after neural injury, or healthy people trying to learn a new skill,” Gulati said.

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