Scientists just discovered the largest volcanic region on Earth, and it’s under Antarctica

Scientists just discovered the largest volcanic region on Earth, and it’s under Antarctica

Scientists just discovered the largest volcanic region on Earth, and it’s under Antarctica

Scientists have discovered the largest volcanic region on Earth – about 100 volcanoes – two kilometers from the surface of the vast ice sheet of Antarctica.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom showed a huge 91 volcanoes, adding to the other 47 that had been previously discovered, with the highest as high as the Eiger, which reaches about 4000 meters, Switzerland.

The newly discovered volcanoes are 100 to 3850 meters high. All are covered with thick layers of ice.

These active peaks are concentrated in an area known as the Western Antarctic fault system, which stretches 3,500 kilometers from the Antarctic ice shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula, the researchers said.

“We do not intend to find anything like that number,” said Robert Bingham of the University of Edinburgh, “The Guardian.” We have nearly tripled the number of known volcanoes in West Antarctica.

“We also believe that there is more at the bottom of the sea that lies beneath the Ross ice shelf, it is very likely that this region will become the densest region of volcanoes in the world larger than east Africa , Where up to Nyiragongo, Kilimanjaro, Longonot and all other active volcanoes are concentrated, “Bingham said.

The researchers said that any activity in this range could have important implications for the rest of the planet.
“If one of these volcanoes were erupting, it could further destabilize the ice sheets of western Antarctica.

Anything that makes ice melt – that a rash probably – would accelerate the flow of ice into the sea, “Bingham said.

Researchers also observed an alarming trend that the most volcanic activity in the world today is found in areas that have recently lost their ice cover – after the end of the last ice age.

This could happen in West Antarctica, where significant warming in the region caused by climate change has begun to affect its ice sheets, according to the researchers.

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